Ventricular Septal Defects

Heart with Ventricular Septal Defects

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Simple ventricular septal defects are the most common form of congenital heart disease. A ventricular septal defect is a hole in the wall between the right and left ventricles (ventricular septum). A VSD can potentially cause a shunting of blood from the left ventricle to the right ventricle or from the right ventricle to the left ventricle. The position and size of the VSD determine the physiology and, in turn, dictate the timing of intervention.

The ventricular septum is made up of two components, the truncal portion and the conoseptal portion. These two sections fit together like two pieces of a puzzle. The position of the VSD among these two portions of the septum determines the type of VSD.


Five Types of VSD

 
Conoventricular

A conoventricular VSD results when there is a space between where the two portions of the ventricular septum meet. This type of VSD is not typically associated with other forms of congenital heart disease. The size of a conoventricular VSD is the predominate indicator of physiology. A small conoventricular VSD may close on its own as the child grows. A larger VSD may cause greater strain on the heart and need to be repaired surgically. Surgical repair entails patch closure of the VSD using a synthetic material.

 
Muscular

Muscular VSDs are the most common type of VSD and are not usually associated with other forms of congenital heart disease. A muscular VSD is a hole located in the truncal portion of the ventricular septum. Again, size is the predominate indicator of physiology. This type of VSD has the highest chance of spontaneous closure and therefore requires less surgery.

 
Conoseptal

A conoseptal VSD is a hole located in the conoseptal portion of the ventricular septum. This type of VSD has almost no chance for spontaneous closure and often requires surgical repair.

 
Atrioventricular Canal Type

An Atrioventricular Canal Type VSD is a hole located in the upper portion of the ventricular septum. Often, this type of VSD is associated with a large ASD as well as malformed atrioventricular valves in a complex congenital heart disease known as Complete Common Atrioventricular Canal Defect (see below).

An Atrioventricular Canal Type VSD allows oxygen-rich blood from the left ventricle to pass into the right ventricle resulting in increased blood flow to the lungs. This type of VSD has no chance of spontaneous closure. Surgical repair is required and involves patch closure of the VSD using a synthetic material

 
Malalignment

Malalignment of the conoseptal portion of the ventricular septum results in a malalignment VSD. This type of VSD causes one of the most common forms of congenital heart disease known as Tetralogy of Fallot. Because the two portions of the ventricular septum have failed to align properly, the anatomy of other structures in the heart are affected. Namely, there is less space for the growth of the pulmonary valve and artery resulting in pulmonary stenosis. In addition, the aorta is not aligned properly resulting in an overriding aorta (i.e. the aorta lies directly over the VSD). Finally, the right ventricle typically works at the lower, pulmonary pressure. Due to the presence of the VSD, the right and left ventricles are pumping at the same pressure. A secondary condition, known as right ventricular hypertrophy (enlargement of the right ventricle), is a result of the right ventricle working at systemic pressure.

The resistance of blood flow through the stenotic pulmonary valve results in deoxygenated blood flowing from the right ventricle through the VSD directly into the left ventricle. This deoxygenated blood is then pumped from the left ventricle out to the body causing the baby to appear cyanotic or blue. Corrective surgery involves patch closure of the VSD and enlargement of the narrow area of the pulmonary artery and right ventricle.


What is Normal Cardiac Anatomy?

When your child has a congenital heart defect, there's usually something wrong with the structure of his or her heart's structure.

 
Learn More About Normal Cardiac Anatomy

Heart with Normal Cardiac Anatomy

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When your child has a congenital heart defect, there's usually something wrong with the structure of his or her heart's structure.

The heart is composed of four chambers. The two upper chambers, known as atria, collect blood as it flows back to the heart. The two lower chambers, known as ventricles, pump blood with each heartbeat to the two main arteries (the pulmonary artery and the aorta). The septum is the wall that divides the heart into right and left sides. The atrial septum separates the right and left atria; likewise, the ventricular septum separates the two ventricles.

There are four valves that control the flow of blood through the heart. These flap-like structures allow blood to flow in only one direction. The tricuspid and mitral valves, also known as the atrioventricular valves, separate the upper and lower chambers of the heart. The aortic and pulmonary valves, also known as the arterial valves, separate the ventricles from the main arteries. Oxygen-depleted blood returns from the body and drains into the right atrium via the superior and inferior vena cavas. The blood in the right atrium then passes through the tricuspid valve and enters the right ventricle.

Next, the blood passes through the pulmonary valve, enters the pulmonary artery, and travels to the lungs where it is replenished with oxygen. The oxygen-rich blood returns to the heart via the pulmonary veins, draining into the left atrium. The blood in the left atrium passes through the bicuspid, or mitral, valve and enters the left ventricle.

Finally, the oxygen-rich blood flows through the aortic valve into the aorta and out to the rest of the body.

Patent Ductus Arteriosus (PDA)

The lungs are not used while a fetus is in the amniotic fluid because the baby gets oxygen directly from the mother's placenta. When a newborn breathes and begins to use the lungs, the DA is no longer needed and usually closes during the first 2 days after birth.

But when the DA fails to close, a condition called patent (meaning "open") ductus arteriosus (PDA) results, in which oxygen-rich blood from the aorta is allowed to mix with oxygen-poor blood in the pulmonary artery. As a result, too much blood flows into the lungs, which puts a strain on the heart and increases blood pressure in the pulmonary arteries.

Causes

The cause of PDA is not known, but genetics might play a role. PDA is more common in premature babies and affects twice as many girls as boys. It's also common among babies with neonatal respiratory distress syndrome, babies with genetic disorders (such as Down syndrome), and babies whose mothers had German measles (rubella) during pregnancy.

In the vast majority of babies with a PDA but an otherwise normal heart, the PDA will shrink and go away on its own in the first few days of life. Some PDAs that don't close then will close on their own by the time the child is a year old.

In premature infants, the PDA is more likely to stay open, particularly if the baby has lung disease. When this happens, treatment to close the PDA might be considered.

In infants born with additional heart defects that decrease blood flow from the heart to the lungs or decrease the flow of oxygen-rich blood to the body, the PDA could actually be beneficial and the doctor might prescribe medicine to keep the ductus arteriosus open.

Symptoms and Tests

Babies with a large PDA might experience symptoms such as:

  • a bounding (strong and forceful) pulse
  • fast breathing
  • poor feeding habits
  • shortness of breath
  • sweating while feeding
  • tiring very easily
  • poor growth

If a PDA is suspected, the doctor will use a stethoscope to listen for a heart murmur, which is often heard in babies with PDAs. Follow-up tests might include:

  • a chest X-ray
  • an EKG, a test that measures the heart's electrical activity and can show if the heart is enlarged
  • an echocardiogram, a test that uses sound waves to diagnose heart problems. These waves bounce off parts of the heart, creating a picture of the heart that is shown on a monitor. In babies with PDA, an echo shows how big the opening is and how well the heart is handling it.

Treatment

The three treatment options for PDA are medication, catheter-based procedures, and surgery. A doctor will close a PDA if the size of the opening is large enough that the lungs could become overloaded with blood, a condition that can lead to an enlarged heart.

A PDA also might be closed to reduce the risk of developing a heart infection known as endocarditis, which affects the tissue lining the heart and blood vessels. Endocarditis is serious and requires treatment with intravenous (IV) antibiotics.

Reviewed by: Gina Baffa, MD
Date reviewed: February 2012