Ventricular Septal Defects

Heart With Ventricular Septal Defects

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Simple ventricular septal defects are the most common form of congenital heart disease. A ventricular septal defect is a hole in the wall between the right and left ventricles (ventricular septum). A VSD can potentially cause a shunting of blood from the left ventricle to the right ventricle or from the right ventricle to the left ventricle. The position and size of the VSD determine the physiology and, in turn, dictate the timing of intervention.

The ventricular septum is made up of two components, the truncal portion and the conoseptal portion. These two sections fit together like two pieces of a puzzle. The position of the VSD among these two portions of the septum determines the type of VSD.


Five Types of VSD

 
Conoventricular

A conoventricular VSD results when there is a space between where the two portions of the ventricular septum meet. This type of VSD is not typically associated with other forms of congenital heart disease. The size of a conoventricular VSD is the predominate indicator of physiology. A small conoventricular VSD may close on its own as the child grows. A larger VSD may cause greater strain on the heart and need to be repaired surgically. Surgical repair entails patch closure of the VSD using a synthetic material.

 
Muscular

Muscular VSDs are the most common type of VSD and are not usually associated with other forms of congenital heart disease. A muscular VSD is a hole located in the truncal portion of the ventricular septum. Again, size is the predominate indicator of physiology. This type of VSD has the highest chance of spontaneous closure and therefore requires less surgery.

 
Conoseptal

A conoseptal VSD is a hole located in the conoseptal portion of the ventricular septum. This type of VSD has almost no chance for spontaneous closure and often requires surgical repair.

 
Atrioventricular Canal Type

An Atrioventricular Canal Type VSD is a hole located in the upper portion of the ventricular septum. Often, this type of VSD is associated with a large ASD as well as malformed atrioventricular valves in a complex congenital heart disease known as Complete Common Atrioventricular Canal Defect (see below).

An Atrioventricular Canal Type VSD allows oxygen-rich blood from the left ventricle to pass into the right ventricle resulting in increased blood flow to the lungs. This type of VSD has no chance of spontaneous closure. Surgical repair is required and involves patch closure of the VSD using a synthetic material

 
Malalignment

Malalignment of the conoseptal portion of the ventricular septum results in a malalignment VSD. This type of VSD causes one of the most common forms of congenital heart disease known as Tetralogy of Fallot. Because the two portions of the ventricular septum have failed to align properly, the anatomy of other structures in the heart are affected. Namely, there is less space for the growth of the pulmonary valve and artery resulting in pulmonary stenosis. In addition, the aorta is not aligned properly resulting in an overriding aorta (i.e. the aorta lies directly over the VSD). Finally, the right ventricle typically works at the lower, pulmonary pressure. Due to the presence of the VSD, the right and left ventricles are pumping at the same pressure. A secondary condition, known as right ventricular hypertrophy (enlargement of the right ventricle), is a result of the right ventricle working at systemic pressure.

The resistance of blood flow through the stenotic pulmonary valve results in deoxygenated blood flowing from the right ventricle through the VSD directly into the left ventricle. This deoxygenated blood is then pumped from the left ventricle out to the body causing the baby to appear cyanotic or blue. Corrective surgery involves patch closure of the VSD and enlargement of the narrow area of the pulmonary artery and right ventricle.


What Is Normal Cardiac Anatomy?

When your child has a congenital heart defect, there's usually something wrong with the structure of his or her heart's structure.

 
Learn More About Normal Cardiac Anatomy

Heart With Normal Cardiac Anatomy

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When your child has a congenital heart defect, there's usually something wrong with the structure of his or her heart's structure.

The heart is composed of four chambers. The two upper chambers, known as atria, collect blood as it flows back to the heart. The two lower chambers, known as ventricles, pump blood with each heartbeat to the two main arteries (the pulmonary artery and the aorta). The septum is the wall that divides the heart into right and left sides. The atrial septum separates the right and left atria; likewise, the ventricular septum separates the two ventricles.

There are four valves that control the flow of blood through the heart. These flap-like structures allow blood to flow in only one direction. The tricuspid and mitral valves, also known as the atrioventricular valves, separate the upper and lower chambers of the heart. The aortic and pulmonary valves, also known as the arterial valves, separate the ventricles from the main arteries. Oxygen-depleted blood returns from the body and drains into the right atrium via the superior and inferior vena cavas. The blood in the right atrium then passes through the tricuspid valve and enters the right ventricle.

Next, the blood passes through the pulmonary valve, enters the pulmonary artery, and travels to the lungs where it is replenished with oxygen. The oxygen-rich blood returns to the heart via the pulmonary veins, draining into the left atrium. The blood in the left atrium passes through the bicuspid, or mitral, valve and enters the left ventricle.

Finally, the oxygen-rich blood flows through the aortic valve into the aorta and out to the rest of the body.

A to Z: Hypoplastic Left Heart Syndrome

A to Z: Hypoplastic Left Heart Syndrome

May also be called: HLHS

Hypoplastic (HI-puh-plas-tik) left heart syndrome (HLHS) is a rare and serious defect in which the structures of the left side of the heart (the left ventricle, the mitral valve, and the aortic valve) are underdeveloped. As a result, blood cannot be adequately pumped throughout the body.

More to Know

Hypoplastic left heart syndrome is present at birth (congenital) and has no known cause. It is usually diagnosed within the first few days of life. Without surgery to repair the heart, HLHS is fatal.

Symptoms of HLHS include blue or gray skin color (cyanosis), rapid breathing, pounding heart, shortness of breath, cold hands and feet, weak pulse, unusual drowsiness and poor feeding.

Once diagnosed with HLHS, most babies will undergo a series of three operations beginning shortly after birth and ending at 3 years of age. For some babies, heart transplant is the best option if a donated organ is available.

Keep in Mind

While many babies now survive HLHS, they need to be monitored closely by a cardiologist for the rest of their lives. Many complications can occur with HLHS and sometimes additional heart surgery or even heart transplant may be necessary as children born with HLHS get older.

All A to Z dictionary entries are regularly reviewed by KidsHealth medical experts.

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Date reviewed: September 26, 2016