Nerves are like messengers. They’re in constant touch with the body’s organs and muscles, delivering commands from the brain and bringing information back to it. When something goes wrong with the flow of information between the brain and the rest of the body, either because of an injury or a health condition, your child might need to see a pediatric neurologist (“nu-ROL-o-jist”) – a doctor who treats neurological disorders in children.


Seizures are caused by abnormal electrical activity in the brain. It can be hard to tell if a person has had a seizure. Someone having a seizure might collapse, shake uncontrollably, or even just stare into space. All of these are brief disturbances in brain function, often with a loss of or change in consciousness.

Seizures can be frightening, but most last only a few minutes, stop on their own, and are not life threatening. A person who has had two or more seizures may be diagnosed with epilepsy, also known as seizure disorder.

Seizure Basics

Under normal circumstances, the brain has electrical activity in which neurons in different areas send signals at different times. During a seizure, many neurons fire all at once. This abnormal pattern of electrical activity can cause different events in the body. Symptoms may vary depending on the part of the brain involved, but may include unusual sensations, uncontrollable muscle spasms, and loss of consciousness.

Some seizures may be due to another medical problem, such as fever, an infection, a head injury, accidental poisoning, or drug overdose. They also can be caused by a brain tumor or other health problem affecting the brain. And anything that results in a sudden lack of oxygen or a reduction in blood flow to the brain can cause a seizure. In some cases, a seizure's cause is never discovered.

Seizures that happen more than once or over and over might indicate the ongoing condition epilepsy.

Febrile seizures can happen in children younger than 6 years old. While they can be scary to watch, these seizures are usually brief and rarely cause any serious or long-term problems, unless the fever is associated with a serious infection, such as meningitis.

Other types of spells look like (but aren't) seizures, such as breath-holding spells.

Episodes of syncope (SIN-ko-pee), or fainting spells, are not uncommon in older kids and teens. When they happen, kids might have a brief seizure or seizure-like spell. They might stiffen or even twitch or convulse a few times. Fortunately, fainting is rarely a sign of epilepsy. Most kids recover very quickly (seconds to minutes) and don't need specialized treatment.

If Your Child Has a Seizure

First, take a deep breath and make sure that your child is in a safe place where he or she can't get hurt. A child who is having a seizure should be placed on the ground or floor in a safe area, preferably on his or her right side. Remove any nearby objects. Loosen any clothing around the head or neck. Don't try to wedge the child's mouth open or place an object between the teeth, and don't try to restrain movements.

Once the seizure seems to have ended, gently comfort and protect your child. It's best for kids to remain lying down until they have recovered fully and want to move around.

Call 911 immediately if your child:

  • has difficulty breathing
  • turns bluish in color
  • has had a head injury
  • seems ill
  • has a known heart condition
  • has never had a seizure before
  • might have ingested any poisons, medications, etc.

If your child has previously had seizures, call 911 if the seizure lasts more than 5 minutes or is for some reason very alarming to you and you're worried for your child's safety.

If your child is breathing normally and the seizure lasts just a few minutes, you can wait until it lets up to call your doctor.

Following the seizure, kids are often be tired or confused and may fall into a deep sleep (called the postictal period). You do not need to try to wake your child as long as he or she is breathing comfortably. Don't try to give food or drink until your child is awake and alert.

For a child who has febrile seizures, the doctor may suggest giving fever-reducing medicine like ibuprofen or acetaminophen for the child's comfort, though these are not known to prevent febrile seizures.

After a seizure — particularly if it is a first or unexplained seizure — call your doctor or emergency medical services for instructions. Your child will usually need to be seen by a doctor as soon as possible.

Reviewed by: Rupal Christine Gupta, MD
Date reviewed: September 26, 2016