Meatal Stenosis

Meatal stenosis is a narrowing of the opening of the urethra, on the glans or tip of the penis. The urethra is the tube through which urine leaves the body.

What are the symptoms of meatal stenosis?

If your son has meatal stenosis, the opening (meatus) on the tip of his penis is very tight, which can make it difficult and often painful for him to urinate (pee). He may urinate with a deflected or small urinary stream.

In addition, it may take a very long time for him to finish urinating. Urinary tract infections (UTIs) may be more common, and even without an infection, your child may complain of burning or discomfort when urinating.

What is meatal stenosis treated?

In order to make the opening on the penis larger so that your child can pee freely, your Nemours urologist will perform what’s called a meatotomy or meatoplasty, an outpatient operating room procedure that takes about a half an hour.

A to Z: Edema

A to Z: Edema

Edema (eh-DEE-mah) is swelling due to the build-up of excess fluid in the body's tissues.

More to Know

Most often edema is found in the hands, arms, feet, ankles, or legs, but it can affect any part of the body, separately or as a whole. Signs of edema include stretched or shiny skin and dimples that remain in the skin after pressing down for 5 seconds.

Many things can cause edema, like sunburn, insect bites and stings, and even some medicines. Certain diseases of the heart, liver, kidneys, and thyroid also can cause edema.

Treatment of edema depends on what's causing it. It may be as simple as taking an antihistamine if due to an allergic reaction. Or, if it's related to the heart or kidney, a doctor might recommend taking a medicine called a diuretic (or water pill) to reduce swelling. Also, wearing support stockings or cutting back on salt intake can help. If another condition, like a liver or thyroid problem, is causing edema, the doctor will treat that, too.

Keep in Mind

Edema can be a temporary nuisance or a sign of a more serious problem. It should be evaluated by a health care provider to determine the cause. If you see signs of edema along with difficulty breathing or chest pain, call 911 or go to the emergency room right away.

All A to Z dictionary entries are regularly reviewed by KidsHealth medical experts.

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Date reviewed: September 26, 2016