Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation (Rehabilitation Medicine)

therapist with child using a walker

If your child’s functional ability and communication skills have been affected by disease or traumatic injury, look to the Nemours experts in pediatric rehabilitation medicine (also known as pediatric physical medicine and rehabilitation or PM&R). Our pediatric rehabilitation program for children up to age 17 is designed to help your child improve the abilities to move and communicate, and to function as independently as possible in the home, school and community environments.

 
A Team Approach for Successful Pediatric Rehabilitation Medicine

To accomplish this, we use a true team approach to include related areas of expertise and coordinate care. Your child will benefit from the knowledge and skill of our board-certified physicians in physical medicine — also called rehab physicians or pediatric physiatrists (pronounced fi-zee-a'-trists) — neuropsychologists, physical therapists, speech therapists, occupational therapists, social workers and rehabilitation nurses, among others. One of our pediatric rehab physicians will lead your child’s care team. These physicians have completed residencies in physical medicine and rehabilitation and either one year of practice as licensed physiatrists or one year of physical medicine and rehabilitation fellowships following the completion of their residencies.

We’ll use a coordinated, integrated approach to evaluate your child, develop a treatment plan, and provide all of the necessary therapeutic services. And we’ll give you both the education and training you’ll need to continue your child’s progress at home.

 
Conditions That Pediatric Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Addresses

We offer pediatric rehabilitation medicine services for a wide range of conditions, including:

  • traumatic brain injury (including concussion)
  • acquired brain injury (such as a stroke, brain tumor or loss of oxygen to the brain)
  • pediatric spinal cord dysfunction (including those resulting in ventilator dependency)
  • amputation
  • congenital and acquired neuromuscular disorders (including cerebral palsy, spina bifida, muscular dystrophy and juvenile rheumatoid arthritis)
  • burns
  • encephalitis
  • meningitis
  • post-surgery for orthopedic conditions and injuries
  • multiple trauma
  • chronic musculoskeletal (orthopedic) pain including myofascial pain syndromes (chronic pain on sensitive points in your muscles in seemingly unrelated parts of your body) and reflex sympathetic dystrophy/chronic regional pain syndrome (RSD/CRPS), a chronic disease characterized by severe pain, swelling and changes in the skin
  • cancer
  • developmental disabilities