Congenital Heart Defects

girl making heart symbol with fingers

Finding out your child has congenital heart disease, commonly called a congenital “heart defect,” can be frightening. You’re probably worried, stressed, and filled with questions about what the diagnosis really means. Nemours’ top-notch pediatric cardiologists will help ease your concerns and give you the congenital heart defect answers you need.

 
Read More About Congenital Heart Defects

Congenital heart disease is actually fairly common. In fact, more than 35,000 babies are born with a heart defect each year in the United States. Most (about two-thirds of) children with heart disease have a “congenital” heart defect, when a baby is born with a heart problem because the heart didn’t develop normally or completely in the early weeks of pregnancy. Other children may have something called an “acquired” heart condition, when a heart problem develops at some point between infancy and adolescence.

We Can Help

If your child was born with a heart defect, a lot can be done to improve and often completely repair kids’ hearts at any age. Thanks to advanced technology and our expert cardiology teams at Nemours, your child — even a newborn only hours old — can be quickly detected and treated right when it matters the most. You can count on our experts to give you an accurate, swift diagnosis and advanced treatment.

We’ve assembled some of the country’s very best pediatric cardiac expertise and technology, and we specialize in early detection and repair, so your child will have the very best possible chance for a healthy future.

Understanding Congenital Heart Defects

When your child has a heart condition, learning as much as you can about the problem can help make things much less stressful and scary for you, your child, and your whole family. Understanding what the defect can help you talk to your child about what it all means and what to expect from treatment. Plus, the more you know, the more informed you can be to make educated decisions about — and be a better advocate for — your child’s health care.